Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 18:00

 

Summer is winding down and Winnipeggers are gearing up to go back to school and begin recreational programming for the fall. What does Peg tells us about how active Winnipeggers are compared to Canadians overall?

52.4 per cent of Winnipeggers are ‘sometimes’ or ‘often’ physically active during their leisure time—a figure lower than the national average of 53.7 per cent.

Peg tells us…

  • In 2014, 52.4 per cent of Winnipeggers were sometimes or often physically active during their leisure time, down slightly from 54.3 per cent five years earlier.
  • For the first time in almost ten years, fewer Winnipeggers were physically active in 2014 than the national average (52.4 per cent of Winnipeggers vs. 53.7 per cent of Canadians).

Definitions:

Why does this matter?

  • Regular physical activity has many benefits. It helps growth and development, prevents chronic diseases, strengthens muscles, increases energy levels, decreases stress levels and helps keep people more independent as they age (PHAC, 2016).

Source of the data:

  • Peg’s data for the Active Leisure Time indicator is provided by Statistics Canada.  

Media inquiries:

For interviews on Peg, the data, or to be connected with organizations making a difference in the community, please contact:

Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Office
International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)
(204) 958-7700 ex 740 | sbath@iisd.ca

Follow Peg on Social media:

Twitter: @Pegindicators
Facebook: MyPeg
Youtube: MyPegCIS


Wednesday, May 31, 2017 - 19:43

Winnipeggers are recycling more, using less water, and producing less greenhouse gas, says new report

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA – Winnipeggers per capita reduced the amount of waste sent to local landfills over a 15-year period—using recycling, composting and other programs to more than triple diverted waste. Winnipeggers also used 50% less water and produced fewer greenhouse gas emissions over the same period.

These are just some of the findings available in: Our City: A Peg Report on the Natural and Built Environment. The third annual report from the Peg project  - explores how the state of our environment has a profound impact on our health, well-being and ability to prosper. It also reveals how we as citizens are impacting the environment around us. 
 
“This third Peg well-being report gives us insight into the relationship Winnipeggers have with the city’s natural and built environments,” said Scott Vaughan, President- CEO, International Insitute for Sustainable Development (IISD). 
 
“We can pride ourselves on our clean air and water, our parks, open spaces and joint actions to reduce our environmental footprint in so many ways by so many individual actions—such as diverting waste from the landfill and public and active transit decisions. The indicators discussed in this report mirror everyday actions and values of Winnipeggers in creating a city where we all aspire to live.”
 
The report is being released in advance of World Environmental Day, Monday, June 5, 2017. This year’s theme is Connecting People to Nature. As host country, Canada chose the theme to encourage more people to get outdoors, appreciate nature’s beauty and importance, and protect the Earth we share.
 
The Peg report intends to add to important converstions already underway in our community about how we can improve conditions and make Winnipeg a healthier, more sustainable place to live.
 
Results were measured using 13 indicators: air quality, water quality, parks and open spaces, dwelling density, core housing need, waste and water diversion, water use, greenhouse gas emissions, transportation, collision victims, active leisure time, activity limitation and perception of safety.
 
While some indicators such as core housing need and dwelling density are improving, other aspects of our environment, including water quality, need further attention. And while we are sending less to the landfill, overall we are throwing more away (garbage, recycling and compost collectively).
 
“The relationship between humans and our environment requires attention, care and work to achieve our goals for sustainability and well-being,” said Vaughan.“This report affirms where our efforts have made a difference, while identifying where we must do more as a community.”
 
The full report is available online here: Peg 2017 Wellbeing Report   
 
An accompanying video is available at: Peg 2017 Wellbeing Report Video
 
Peg (mypeg.ca) is a community indicator system that measures the health of our city year over year – in ways that count. Peg is led by two partnering organizations – the International Institute of Sustainable Development and United Way Winnipeg. Peg is the starting place for citizens, educators, policy-makers, and other Winnipeggers to learn how we can help make Winnipeg better for all of us, for generations. At Peg we can all learn how our lives, our neighbourhoods and our city is changing – for better or worse. Learn more at www.mypeg.ca.
 
For more information, please contact:
 

Sumeep Bath
Media and Communications Officer, International Institute for Sustainable Development
Phone: 204-958-7700, ext. 740                                                     
Email: sbath@iisd.ca

or

Scott Sime
Vice-President, Marketing and Communications, United Way Winnipeg
Phone: 204-924-4250  (office) | 204-801-5877 (cell)                                                     
Email: ssime@unitedwaywinnipeg.mb.ca


Monday, May 15, 2017 - 18:29

A new indicator featured on mypeg.ca measures the percentage of Winnipeggers who are sometimes or often limited in their ability to participate in an activity or carry out a daily activity due to an inadequate physical or mental support. The Activity Limitation indicator is also featured in an upcoming Peg report on the natural and built environment, to be released in connection with World Environment Day at the beginning of June.

Peg data shows the percentage of Winnipeggers reporting activity  limitations is consistently higher than the national average.

What else can Peg tell us about activity limitation in Winnipeg?

Peg tells us…
 
  • Between 2003 and 2014, the percentage of Winnipeggers who reported facing participation or activity limitation increased from 31.7 per cent to 35.2 per cent.
  • An average of 34 per cent of Winnipeggers reported having activity limitations during this same period—3 per cent higher than the Canadian average of 31 per cent.

Definitions:

  • This is a broad indicator that speaks to individuals’ accessibility based on mental or physical impairment or disability. The data source reports on individuals’ limitations in carrying out daily tasks or participating in events but does not ask to specify the nature of the limitation.

Why does this matter?

  • All Winnipeggers have the right to access services and participate in community and social events and carry out daily activities. Common accessibility barriers are architectural or physical in nature, although they may also be technological, organizational, attitudinal or communication-related. Accessibility is important so that all Winnipeggers can reach their potential.
  • The Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) became law in December, 2013. This legislation provides a proactive process to remove barriers affecting persons with disabilities and many other citizens. Under this landmark legislation, the Manitoba government will develop mandatory accessibility standards. Each standard will address barriers for Manitobans in key areas of daily living. Standards will apply to Manitoba’s private and public sector organizations. 
  • More detail and source data for the above facts available at: http://www.mypeg.ca/explorer/WellBeing/BuiltEnvironment/Activitylimitation/

Source of the data:

  • Peg’s data for the Substance Abuse indicator is provided by the Statistics Canada Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). CANSIM table 105-0502.

Media inquiries:

  • For interviews on Peg, the data, or to be connected with organizations making a difference in the community, please contact:

Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Officer
International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)
(204) 958-7700 ex 740 | sbath@iisd.ca

Follow Peg on Social media:

Twitter: @Pegindicators
Facebook: MyPeg
Youtube: MyPegCIS


Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 16:22

The percentage of Winnipeggers living in core housing need has been decreasing for the last twenty years, and is now lower than the national average and comparable to Canadian cities.

This has all been happening as the cost of housing across Canada continues to climb, and while Winnipeg’s market has not seen the same growth as bigger centres like Toronto and Vancouver, finding suitable, affordable housing remains a challenge at every income level.    

Peg tells us…
  • Between 1991 and 2011, the percentage of people living in core housing need in Winnipeg dropped from 14.6 per cent to 10.3 per cent. The majority of this decrease happened between 1996 and 2001, with only very small decreases since that time.

  • Since 1996, Winnipeg has had a smaller proportion of people in core housing need than the Canadian average. In 2011, this rate was comparable to Calgary (10 per cent) and lower than Ottawa and Edmonton (11 per cent).

Why does this matter?

  • Core housing need speaks to the importance of having adequate, affordable housing with sufficient space. When any or all of the above criteria for standard living conditions are not met, households have more stress placed on their resources and health.

  • More detail and source data for the above facts available at: http://www.mypeg.ca/explorer/WellBeing/BasicNeeds/CoreHousingNeed/

Definitions: 

  • Core housing need measures the percentage of households whose housing: i) costs more than 30 per cent of their income, ii) requires major repairs, or iii) is too small for the number of occupants, and who cannot afford to pay the median cost of rent for housing that would meet these standards

Source of the data:

  • Peg’s data for the Core Housing Need indicator is provided by the Canada Mortgage & Housing Corporation (www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/).

Media inquiries:

  • For interviews on Peg, the data, or to be connected with organizations making a difference in the community, please contact:

Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Officer
International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)
(204) 958-7700 ex 740 | sbath@iisd.ca


Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 17:21
November 13th to 19th is National Addictions Awareness Week. What does Peg tell us about rates of substance abuse in Winnipeg?
 
Peg tells us…
  • The substance abuse indicator measures the number of people aged 10 or older who have been diagnosed as abusing drugs or alcohol.
  • There is a strong connection between income and social well-being. Low income communities experience higher rates of social issues related to health, education, and housing, among others. 
  • Rates of substance abuse in community areas vary across the city, from a low of 2.6 per cent in Fort Garry, to a high of 9.8 per cent in Point Douglas. 
  • City-wide, the rate of substance abuse has remained stable at 4.9 per cent (this includes two five year periods; 2002/03-2006/07 and 2007/08-2011/12).
 
Why does this matter?
  • Peg’s most recent report on health equity showed a consistent pattern: that economic and social disadvantage results in lower health status in communities across Winnipeg. The relationship between income and social issues is complex, and will require combined efforts to work towards awareness, understanding, and improvement.     
  • Tens of thousands of Canadians are hospitalized each year for alcohol abuse - approximately 86,000 per year according to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) (2005, p. 6). 
  • In addition to the human cost, the economic costs of substance abuse to society, and to the health care system are significant. It has been estimated that substance abuse (including tobacco use) cost Canadian society approximately $1,267 for every Canadian, or $39.8 billion in 2002 (CCSA, 2006, p. 1).
  • More detail and source data for the above facts available at: http://www.mypeg.ca/explorer/WellBeing/Health/SubstanceAbuse/
 
Definitions:
  • Substance abuse measures the number of residents aged 10 or older diagnosed with "alcoholic or drug psychoses, alcohol or drug dependence, or nondependent abuse of drugs" (MCHP, 2013, p. 126).
  • This indicator likely undercounts the number of individuals with substance abuse issues, since it only captures individuals visiting physicians or hospitals and being coded to one of the International Classification of Disease (ICD) codes.
 
Source of the data:


Media inquiries:
For interviews on Peg, the data, or to be connected with organizations making a difference in the community, please contact:

Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Officer
International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)
(204) 958-7700 ex 740 | sbath@iisd.ca

 

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 15:25
 
Peg is happy to congratulate Dr. László Pintér, Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at Central European University (Budapest, Hungary) and Senior Fellow and Associate at the International Institute for Sustainable Development on his recent award for the Hall of Heroes at the Community Indicators Consortium (CIC) conference in Washington, D.C. on September 26-27, 2016. This award recognizes individuals who, through their work have developed tools or methods to translate data into community action, making long-term and significant impact on the field and in community well-being.
 
Dr. Pintér has been engaged in the Community Indicators field for over 20 years. He has been involved in many national and international collaborations over the years, working to build the field and he played a key role in crafting sustainability assessment and measurement principles by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. He was also instrumental in starting the Canadian Sustainability Indicators Network, a nation-wide network that brings together practitioners in private and public fields who work with measuring sustainability in its many forms. He is a valued board member of many high-level board and steering committees such as the Asia-Europe Foundation’s Environment Forum, the Balaton Group and the Regional Environmental Centre for Central and Eastern Europe. 
 
Most important, he was also foundational to the development of Peg. Over the years László has dedicated his time, expertise and passion to seeing Peg grow from an idea to an instrument for inspiring action around well-being and community in Winnipeg. We recently took the time to ask László about some of his experiences working with Peg and how it has influenced his work in other areas. 
 
 
What has working on Peg’s development meant to you?
 
"Peg was an exceptional opportunity to prove that the potential of indicators to change lives is real, not just a slogan. This is what IISD advocated globally, but when we were called upon to do this at home, it raised the stakes even further. By 2000 we were no longer a novice in the indicator field and through Peg we could also use Winnipeg as a ‘learning laboratory’ to test innovative ideas that we thought made sense. Engaging the community intensively in Peg’s development with great patience and care; investing in innovative use of technology and visualization; matching numbers with stories of everyday Winnipeggers; negotiating partnership agreements; dealing with the intricacies of Peg’s governance; and most of all, perhaps, designing it as a lasting piece of community infrastructure; these all contributed to its success and growing visibility.”
 
How has Peg impacted your work over the years? Have you incorporated Peg experiences into other projects/concepts or theories on which you have worked? 
 
"For me and for many others in our field who know it, I think Peg became a standard and a point of reference. Whether discussing the transformative power of the way we measure progress at the global level, in some other country or community, I can refer back to Peg and ask “how did we deal with this question?”, or “how could we deal with it in the future?” I haven’t recorded, and probably now can’t count, the number of times I found a way to weave one or more aspects of Peg into my conference talks, graduate students’ thesis projects or ideas put forward by our partners. But there is a clear line of influence between Peg and the Mareas de Tasajera indicator system (of one of my former graduate students in El Salvador): the tool that is used to navigate UNEP Live’s global environmental data, or the way we will build the indicator system in a major new project funded through the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 program, Naturvation, to envision how nature based solutions can inform and change the way we build and run our cities."
 
What can Peg teach other communities both in Canada and abroad?
 
"I consider Peg an indicator system that is well grounded in the community, with a clear identity and a growing recognition. However, it is also a system that should be and is capable of learning and evolving as new issues, new technologies, and new insights emerge. The indicator system in Peg would be a great foundation for conversations not only about how we got here, but what we want for the future in terms of goals, targets and outcomes. Having these goals and visions about health, education, livelihoods, the urban environment, infrastructure, public finance and so on can jolt people into action, especially if there is a promise that Peg will have the numbers and stories about what actually gets done. So what Peg can teach is not just what it is – but what it can be."
 
 
Community indicator systems clearly have the potential to transform numbers into action. From its work with collective impact and the End Homelessness project to its continual efforts to keep the conversation going through videos and media, Peg has been an essential resource in starting dialogues and building community in Winnipeg. László recently spoke about Peg at the TedX Winnipeg event in August 2016, discussing how Peg can move the needle toward the vision we all have for a better Winnipeg. 
 

Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 16:05
 
Nuit Blanche Winnipeg is a free, all-night exploration of contemporary art that takes place Saturday, October 1st, 2016. To celebrate, we took a look at new data from Peg, Winnipeg's community indicator system, on Participation in the Arts. What did the data tell us?  
 

Peg tells us…

  • Between 2007 and 2015, the number of participants in arts & cultural events in Winnipeg increased by 61% - an increase of 1,141,000 people! 
  • In 2015, there were just under 3 million visits to arts & cultural events in the city.

Why does this matter?

  • The arts are a critical element of any community's social vitality. The arts help define our identity, they attract tourists and residents, and give life to the community. 
  • The arts contribute significantly to the economy. Canadian exports of cultural products were valued at almost $1.3 billion in 2010 (Statistics Canada 2012).

Definitions:

Source of the data:

  • Peg’s data for the Participation in Arts indicator is provided by the Winnipeg Arts Council.  

Media inquiries:

For interviews on Peg, the data, or to be connected with organizations making a difference in the community, please contact:

Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Officer
International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)
(204) 958-7700 ex 740 | sbath@iisd.ca
 
 

Monday, August 8, 2016 - 15:24
Summer is a popular time of year for buying and selling homes. We took a look at Peg to see how Winnipeg’s average house price has changed over the past decade.  


Peg tells us:

  • The average price of a house in Winnipeg increased from $137,062 to $278,220 between 2005 and 2015 - an increase of 103%.In 2015, Winnipeg’s average house price was $278,220, compared to an average price across Canada of $442,877.

The facts are:

  • In 2015, Winnipeg’s average house price was $278,220, compared to an average price across Canada of $442,877.
  • Winnipeg’s average house price has increased faster than Canada’s overall over the past ten years; 103% in Winnipeg vs. a 78% increase Canada-wide.  

Why does this matter?

  • Housing is usually the largest component of a household’s wealth. When housing prices go up, homeowners’ net worth increases, and they tend to be more willing to spend more and take on additional debt. This has a significant positive impact on the economy.
  • Conversely, when housing prices decrease, households find it more difficult to borrow (as their equity has decreased), and rather than spending, they tend to try to pay off their mortgages faster.
  • Housing prices also impact Winnipeggers' willingness and ability purchase a home, or to live in certain areas of the city.

Definitions:

  • Average house price measures average residential detached housing prices listed in the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) system - this means that private sales may not be included. Rates are seasonally adjusted.
  • More detail and source data for the above facts available at http://www.mypeg.ca/explorer/WellBeing/Economy/HousePrice/

Source of the data:

  • Peg’s data for the Average House Price indicator is provided by Economic Development Winnipeg. 

Media inquiries:

  • For interviews on Peg, the data, or to be connected with organizations making a difference in the community, please contact Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Officer, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), (204) 958-7700 ext. 740 | sbath@iisd.ca

 


Friday, August 5, 2016 - 14:26
 
In May, Peg was highlighted at TEDxWinnipeg. Dr. Laszlo Pinter talks about how a community uses data to make safer, inclusive and forward moving decisions. 
 
Dr. Pinter is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy at the Central European University in Budapest and a Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Sustainable Development.
 
You can watch the complete Ted talk here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKPPG_3armg

Monday, June 27, 2016 - 19:19

June is Stroke Awareness Month. We took a look at data from Peg to explore how income is related to likelihood of stroke in Winnipeg.

 
Peg tells us…
  • People living in Point Douglas have the highest rate of stroke of all community areas in Winnipeg at 4.14; double the rate compared to people living in Fort Garry.

The facts are:
  • Lower income Winnipeggers are significantly more likely to have a stroke than those in the highest income quintile. The lowest income 20% were 64 per cent more likely to have a stroke than the 20% with the highest income.

  • The rate of hospitalization or death due to a stroke in WInnipeg was 2.6 per thousand residents aged 40 and over in 2007-2011. (The rate has decreased slightly since 2002-2006, when it was 2.7 per thousand.)

Why does this matter?
  • Cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attack and stroke, are the leading causes of death globally, and represent a third of all deaths in Winnipeg in any given year. These diseases are also a leading cause of hospitalization and adult disability. Heart attacks and strokes are associated with social and economic disadvantage. Opportunities for employment, income, education, and housing have enormous potential to reduce the unequal burden of heart disease and stroke.

Definitions:
  • The stroke indicator measures the number of hospitalizations or deaths due to stroke per 1,000 residents aged 40 and older. Rates are sex- and age- adjusted.

  • It should be noted that patients who were attended by nurses, misdiagnosed, or did not seek treatment are not recorded in official statistics in the database.

  • *More detail and source data for the above facts available at http://www.mypeg.ca/explorer/WellBeing/Health/Stroke/

Source of the data:

We’d love to connect you with someone who can tell you more about Peg, the data, or who is making a difference in the community. Please contact: Sumeep Bath, Media and Communications Officer, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) | (204) 958-7740 | sbath@iisd.ca


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